Villa Kogelhof Expands the Horizon while Preserving a Natural Habitat

The Villa Kogelhof in the Netherlands designed by Paul de Ruiter Architects is a self-sufficient and energy efficient yet simple and comfortable living space that was built to respect the ecological preserve that it’s nestled in.

The glass abode is perched above the land to minimize its imprint while maximizing the view. In this upper area are the main living quarters complete with a living room, kitchen, bedrooms and bathrooms. Even though the house is already served with 360 degree glass exposure, interior glass doors and walls continue inside to extend the sense of freedom and dilation. While the glass facade would appear less effective than other common materials to maintain constant temperature, the outer layer of the glass is insulated and the inner layer contains a retractable sun-reflecting fabric.

The walls and floors are also finished in white to maintain the minimalistic tone while darker furniture characteristic of designers Le Corbusier and Eileen Grey punctuates the contemporary space.

Beneath one end of the hovering home is a V-shaped support structure while the other end serves as a passageway to the underground portion of the house. A 6-car garage and working space are hidden there beneath the shallow pool that shimmies beneath the villa.

Because the home resides on a protected habitat for animals and plants, it was necessary that the design minimized its impact on the land; thus the home will be completely self-sufficient by utilizing solar panels and a windmill to generate all of its electricity. The owners also planted 71,000 trees in 2006 on the land in order to restore the leveled farmland to its original forested state.


Keara Wright

Aspiring creative author and astrophysicist, with degrees in Physics, Mathematics, and Psychology.

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